Dewitts Corvette Direct Fit Radiator C5 Radiator w/ automatic 01 Dewitts Corvette Direct Fit Radiator C5 Radiator w/ automatic 01 Dewitts  FREE SHIPPING This new high performance "Direct Fit" aluminum radiator features two rows of 1" cooling tubes, doubling the cooling capacity of the factory single row. The press formed aluminum end tanks are tig welded to the core, eliminating failures due to cracked plastic end tanks and/or gasket leaks. This unit fits into the original mounting and has all the factory connections. The A01A model features the new metric "quick connect" transmission cooler. So now you can connect the stock transmission lines without adapters! Attention 2001 Corvette owners! It has come to our attention that some early 2001 Corvettes still used the flare connection that was used from 1994-2000. Please check your transmission oil cooler connections before ordering this radiator. There are many philosophies on how to properly cool Corvette engines. From electric blower fans to water additives, people will try just about anything to keep that temperature gauge down. But many Corvette owners overlook the obvious, a good radiator. Let’s start with something as basic as the thermostat. A thermostat is supposed to modulate, just like the thermostat in your house turns the furnace on and off. When the coolant reaches the thermostat setting it opens and lets flow go through the radiator. The radiator, if capable, will drop the temperature down to a point the thermostat modulates. This sounds pretty simple but this doesn’t always happen. In many cases, the thermostat opens and the radiator isn’t effective enough to lower the temperature. So it goes 30-40 degrees higher than the thermostat. You can’t solve this problem with blower fans, high-octane booster, or an $8 bottle of special water. Depending on what year Corvette, the problem can vary, but the solution is always the same. Aluminum radiators can solve your overheating problem. Why are aluminum radiators so much better? Look at the cut away view of a typical four-core brass/copper (Fig. 1) radiator. The area “a” indicates where the tube is in contact with the fin. This is the only area that provides heat dissipation. The area “b” is dead space and does not provide any cooling. Fig. 1 Typical (4) four tube brass/copper design The trick to better cooling is wider tubes. This increases the “tube to fin” contact area, which determines the radiator efficiency. A typical copper radiator uses 3/8” wide tubes (Fig. 1) while the aluminum radiators (Fig. 2) use tubes from 1” to 1 1/4” wide. When a radiator is designed with wide tubes, the tubing wall thickness must be increased to prevent the tube from expanding or a term known as “ballooning”. Fig. 2 Typical aluminum tube design Designing a brass/copper radiator with wide tubes is not practical because the radiators could weigh as much as sixty pounds. The lighter weight aluminum can be designed with a heavier wall thickness with very little effect on weight. Several major companies including Delphi, Visteon, Griffin, and many others have adopted this theory and no longer make any brass/copper radiators Almost every racecar today is currently using an aluminum radiator because of the benefits described above. The chart below illustrates the test results when comparing two equal size radiators. As you can see, the brass radiator was rated almost 30% below the factory design. If your Corvette was originally equipped with an aluminum radiator, then it must stay that way to function properly. If the original factory radiator was brass & copper then you might want to consider upgrading to aluminum. This is a great idea for cars with Big Blocks or air conditioning. When considering a new radiator, ask a lot of questions. If your dealer believes the only difference between the copper/brass and aluminum is the cost, look somewhere else. Anyone suggesting you deviate from an original aluminum radiator either doesn’t know any better or just wants to sell you what's in stock. A good radiator is the only way to protect your engine from excessive heat.

Dewitts Corvette Direct Fit Radiator C5 Radiator w/ automatic 01

Code: A01A
$620.00
In Stock
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FREE SHIPPING

This new high performance "Direct Fit" aluminum radiator features two rows of 1" cooling tubes, doubling the cooling capacity of the factory single row. The press formed aluminum end tanks are tig welded to the core, eliminating failures due to cracked plastic end tanks and/or gasket leaks. This unit fits into the original mounting and has all the factory connections. The A01A model features the new metric "quick connect" transmission cooler. So now you can connect the stock transmission lines without adapters!

Attention 2001 Corvette owners! It has come to our attention that some early 2001 Corvettes still used the flare connection that was used from 1994-2000. Please check your transmission oil cooler connections before ordering this radiator.

There are many philosophies on how to properly cool Corvette engines. From electric blower fans to water additives, people will try just about anything to keep that temperature gauge down. But many Corvette owners overlook the obvious, a good radiator.

Let’s start with something as basic as the thermostat. A thermostat is supposed to modulate, just like the thermostat in your house turns the furnace on and off. When the coolant reaches the thermostat setting it opens and lets flow go through the radiator. The radiator, if capable, will drop the temperature down to a point the thermostat modulates. This sounds pretty simple but this doesn’t always happen.

In many cases, the thermostat opens and the radiator isn’t effective enough to lower the temperature. So it goes 30-40 degrees higher than the thermostat. You can’t solve this problem with blower fans, high-octane booster, or an $8 bottle of special water.

Depending on what year Corvette, the problem can vary, but the solution is always the same. Aluminum radiators can solve your overheating problem. Why are aluminum radiators so much better?

Look at the cut away view of a typical four-core brass/copper (Fig. 1) radiator. The area “a” indicates where the tube is in contact with the fin. This is the only area that provides heat dissipation. The area “b” is dead space and does not provide any cooling.

Fig. 1 Typical (4) four tube brass/copper design

The trick to better cooling is wider tubes. This increases the “tube to fin” contact area, which determines the radiator efficiency. A typical copper radiator uses 3/8” wide tubes (Fig. 1) while the aluminum radiators (Fig. 2) use tubes from 1” to 1 1/4” wide. When a radiator is designed with wide tubes, the tubing wall thickness must be increased to prevent the tube from expanding or a term known as “ballooning”.

Fig. 2 Typical aluminum tube design

Designing a brass/copper radiator with wide tubes is not practical because the radiators could weigh as much as sixty pounds. The lighter weight aluminum can be designed with a heavier wall thickness with very little effect on weight. Several major companies including Delphi, Visteon, Griffin, and many others have adopted this theory and no longer make any brass/copper radiators

Almost every racecar today is currently using an aluminum radiator because of the benefits described above.

The chart below illustrates the test results when comparing two equal size radiators.
As you can see, the brass radiator was rated almost 30% below the factory design.

If your Corvette was originally equipped with an aluminum radiator, then it must stay that way to function properly. If the original factory radiator was brass & copper then you might want to consider upgrading to aluminum. This is a great idea for cars with Big Blocks or air conditioning.

When considering a new radiator, ask a lot of questions. If your dealer believes the only difference between the copper/brass and aluminum is the cost, look somewhere else. Anyone suggesting you deviate from an original aluminum radiator either doesn’t know any better or just wants to sell you what's in stock. A good radiator is the only way to protect your engine from excessive heat.

Â

FREE SHIPPING

This new high performance "Direct Fit" aluminum radiator features two rows of 1" cooling tubes, doubling the cooling capacity of the factory single row. The press formed aluminum end tanks are tig welded to the core, eliminating failures due to cracked plastic end tanks and/or gasket leaks. This unit fits into the original mounting and has all the factory connections. The A01A model features the new metric "quick connect" transmission cooler. So now you can connect the stock transmission lines without adapters!

Attention 2001 Corvette owners! It has come to our attention that some early 2001 Corvettes still used the flare connection that was used from 1994-2000. Please check your transmission oil cooler connections before ordering this radiator.

There are many philosophies on how to properly cool Corvette engines. From electric blower fans to water additives, people will try just about anything to keep that temperature gauge down. But many Corvette owners overlook the obvious, a good radiator.

Let’s start with something as basic as the thermostat. A thermostat is supposed to modulate, just like the thermostat in your house turns the furnace on and off. When the coolant reaches the thermostat setting it opens and lets flow go through the radiator. The radiator, if capable, will drop the temperature down to a point the thermostat modulates. This sounds pretty simple but this doesn’t always happen.

In many cases, the thermostat opens and the radiator isn’t effective enough to lower the temperature. So it goes 30-40 degrees higher than the thermostat. You can’t solve this problem with blower fans, high-octane booster, or an $8 bottle of special water.

Depending on what year Corvette, the problem can vary, but the solution is always the same. Aluminum radiators can solve your overheating problem. Why are aluminum radiators so much better?

Look at the cut away view of a typical four-core brass/copper (Fig. 1) radiator. The area “a” indicates where the tube is in contact with the fin. This is the only area that provides heat dissipation. The area “b” is dead space and does not provide any cooling.

Fig. 1 Typical (4) four tube brass/copper design

The trick to better cooling is wider tubes. This increases the “tube to fin” contact area, which determines the radiator efficiency. A typical copper radiator uses 3/8” wide tubes (Fig. 1) while the aluminum radiators (Fig. 2) use tubes from 1” to 1 1/4” wide. When a radiator is designed with wide tubes, the tubing wall thickness must be increased to prevent the tube from expanding or a term known as “ballooning”.

Fig. 2 Typical aluminum tube design

Designing a brass/copper radiator with wide tubes is not practical because the radiators could weigh as much as sixty pounds. The lighter weight aluminum can be designed with a heavier wall thickness with very little effect on weight. Several major companies including Delphi, Visteon, Griffin, and many others have adopted this theory and no longer make any brass/copper radiators

Almost every racecar today is currently using an aluminum radiator because of the benefits described above.

The chart below illustrates the test results when comparing two equal size radiators.
As you can see, the brass radiator was rated almost 30% below the factory design.

If your Corvette was originally equipped with an aluminum radiator, then it must stay that way to function properly. If the original factory radiator was brass & copper then you might want to consider upgrading to aluminum. This is a great idea for cars with Big Blocks or air conditioning.

When considering a new radiator, ask a lot of questions. If your dealer believes the only difference between the copper/brass and aluminum is the cost, look somewhere else. Anyone suggesting you deviate from an original aluminum radiator either doesn’t know any better or just wants to sell you what's in stock. A good radiator is the only way to protect your engine from excessive heat.